He fell into a sinkhole in Ein Gedi at a depth of about 10 meters and was rescued safely

He fell into a sinkhole in Ein Gedi at a depth of about 10 meters and was rescued safely

Eyal Duzoretz, from Kibbutz Ein Gedi, was walking with his dog east of Highway 90 not far from the kibbutz's orchards, at 08:00 in the morning, on the eve of Shavuot when he suddenly noticed a deer at the bottom of a sinkhole that was about 10 meters deep and 8 meters in diameter (approximately). He arrived at the Ein Gedi nature reserve – Nahal David where he called the regional inspector and the Ein Gedi Public Relations and the Arad station police officers of the Negev Region, who arrived at the scene and rescued the goat safely in a rescue that lasted about two hours.

Commander of the Ein Gedi rescue unit Boaz Laimsider: “We arrived at the scene following a report from the Nature and Parks Authority, we slid into the sinkhole using a rope, we tied the goat that was brought safely up by the inspector and the pressers safely up.”

Shai Rosenzweig, Dead Sea inspector at the Nature and Parks Authority, added that the vigilance of the citizen saved the chameleon with the certainty that he could not have climbed independently from such a deep sinkhole and would have died in the heavy heat in the area. This is a mature buck about 10 years old. The quick cooperation between the forces saved the buck. The size of the ibex population in the Dead Sea area is about 200 ibex. After the rescue, the goat was released back into the wild when he was feeling well and without any injuries.

The Nature and Gardens Authority adds that the Nubian chameleon is a flagship species for nature conservation in Israel. It is a symbol of success in preserving species and is also a symbol of the Nature and Parks Authority since its establishment in 1964. The size of the global population of the gazelle is decreasing, and apparently today the population in Israel is the largest and most protected in the world. The bulk of the population is concentrated in two areas: the Judean Desert and the Negev Mountains. Two small populations live in the mountains of Eilat and the southern steppe and one population in the Golan Heights, which originates from goat-like goats that were previously moved to the Golan Heights.

The census of each population began at a different time and even the census of the oldest among them, in the mountains of Eilat, is counted over a short period of three generations. However, the results of the counts usually indicate stability or a moderate increase in the size of the populations over a period of more than two generations of goats.
This means that the response of the population in the short to medium term to threats, and at the same time the actions of the conservation interface of the Nature Authority of the Gardens, were embodied in stability or an increase in the number.

Photo: Police spokespersons and Nature and Parks Authority spokespersons
Rescue of a ibex from drowning in the Dead Sea
Photo: Police spokespersons and Nature and Parks Authority spokespersons
Rescue of a ibex from drowning in the Dead Sea
Photo: Police spokespersons and Nature and Parks Authority spokespersons
Rescue of a ibex from drowning in the Dead Sea
Photo: Police spokespersons and Nature and Parks Authority spokespersons

Commander of MI's Ein Gedi Public Relations – Boaz Laimsider. Photo: Police spokespersons and Nature and Parks Authority spokespersons

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